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The Technology program develops student perceptions and knowledge of modern day technology. The program provides a basis for informed attitudes about the interrelationships of technology, society, and the environment. Students will have the opportunity to use state-of-the-art equipment to pursue their study. Although students explore courses in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (Industrial Technology and Computer Education), the interrelatedness of these disciplines will be stressed. In the future, interdisciplinary courses will be offered to help students make connections among the disciplines in the Technology Program.

Students will work in project-based learning teams and individually in our "mechatronics lab" with state of the art workstations including Robotics, Programmable Logic Controllers, Electronics and Power Distribution, CNC Milling, Mechanical Power Transmission, Lifting Mechanisms, Pneumatics, Hydraulic Power Systems, Integrated Mechatronic Systems, and a diverse maker space.


Students will learn how to become successful leaders in manufacturing and develop 21st-century skills employable in a technology-driven marketplace.  They will receive a solid foundation in mechatronics, a blended curriculum of electronics, mechanical, and computers, which can readily be used for employment or pursuit of an advanced degree in Engineering or Technology.


The objection of this course is to use a hands-on approach to introduce the basic concepts in robotics, focusing on micro controllers, autonomous mobile robots and real world applications. Information presented in class will be linked to lab experiments. Students will work in teams to build and test increasingly more complex LEGO-based mobile robots. Students will apply what they have learned through a series of robot contests.

The wood construction system course provides students with a working understanding of the key elements associated with designing, planning, and constructing a structure on-site. Students learn major concepts through hands-on activities, using contemporary construction tools and materials. Activities involve a variety of types of construction, such as commercial and residential buildings, bridges, and other structures including cabinets and furniture. Emphasis is placed on student understanding of major concepts associated with each main content element as well as interrelationship of management and production elements. The content and activities are inclusive of the Connecticut Career Clusters of "Construction: Technologies and Design" and "Technologies: Manufacturing, Communications, and Repair".